Mid-Year Update

July 1 marked the halfway point of 2019, so I thought it would be a good time to take stock of my freelance work so far this year. Professionally, it’s been a very rewarding year for me, and I hope the trend continues this summer and fall.

Here are a few highlights from the first half of 2019:

  • I continue to write articles for Healthline, an online medical and wellness website. So far my most-read article of 2019 is “Bleeding After Hysterectomy: Is It Normal & When to Call a Doctor” with 52,924 user sessions. My articles range from these very detailed medical articles to topics that are a little less intense like “Why Is Water Important? 16 Reasons to Drink Up.” I just finished an article called “Is My Baby Having Night Terrors?” and I hope it is helpful to parents.
  • I am now collaborating with a few new clients. One client has hired me to write case studies to help a company market products in the higher education field. I have also found new clients via Reedsy and have been helping authors with their works on gestational diabetes, jazz, and instrument tuning (so far). I always say that I love my job because I come into contact with and learn about such diverse material. It’s a great fit for a lifelong reader and learner!
  • I still edit several academic journals each year. I have now copyedited several issues of the Bulletin for Research on Music Education, the Journal of Animal Ethics, Process Studies, and Jazz and Culture. The work going on in these fields is fascinating.

In addition to these highlights, I wrapped up a long-term ghostwriting collaboration with someone, copyedited/proofread a few upcoming trade books, and used my permissions-acquiring skills with a large medical-educational publisher.

Please let me know if there is anything I can help you finish as the year enters its second half.

Do I Need a Writer, an Editor, or Someone Else?

If you are unfamiliar with the publishing process, you may wonder how a writer, editor, copyeditor, or proofreader can help you. I have worked on projects in all of these roles, and here’s my brief overview of how they serve a publication.

Writer: You may need a writer if you have a lot of ideas but you can’t seem to get them down on paper. A writer can take your stream-of-consciousness thoughts or interview you to create the document you intend to publish. That may be a website, a book, or something else. Writers can also create documents with prompts you give them or a research topic to investigate. I write for many different clients and some of my projects have included writing articles, ghostwriting books or blog posts, summarizing case studies, and more.

Editor: This is a very general title and I would lean toward putting the word “developmental” in front of the title as it concerns an individual seeking help. This person can look at your work so far and give you ideas of how to reshape or retool it to meet your intended audience. A developmental editor can also help you work on flow and ask probing questions to help you dig deeper into your document. At a publishing house, an editor may also be a managing or acquiring editor. A managing editor coordinates all aspects of the publishing process and an acquiring editor finds content to publish.

Copyeditor: This person will copyedit a document that is in very good shape and almost ready for publication. This person uses a style book or style guide (and a dictionary!) to correct grammar, usage, and style errors. A copyeditor may also point out sentences that need clarification or suggest adding headings to improve readability. A copyeditor will also format references in a bibliography or notes section as well as inquire about permissions for artwork or long passages that you borrowed from another source. Your copyeditor may also be willing to fact-check a document if you request it.

Proofreader: A proofreader looks at a nearly published document usually set in its final form. A proofreader will only correct egregious errors like misspellings or the odd (or missing) punctuation mark. The proofreader ensures that everything looks clean and tidy to avoid embarrassing mistakes appearing in the final publication.

There are of course other roles in publishing like typesetters, designers, agents, reviewers, fact-checkers, translators, and more. Before you get too far with your work, however, consider whether you need one (or more) of these types of people involved in your document. Feel free to contact me to chat about your project, and I can provide you with an assessment of what I think you need.

Highlights from May, June, and July

It’s nearing the end of July, and we’ve got a heatwave in Philadelphia. I’m beating the sweltering weather during these dog days in the central air, as I wrap up several projects with impending deadlines.

Here’s what I’ve been working on for the last few months:

  • Contributing to finalizing chapters of a nursing textbook, including finding art and editing references
  • Coding and finalizing chapters for another nursing textbook
  • Editing a graduate-level dissertation on neuroscience and information technology
  • Copyediting journals on Mormon history and music education
  • Proofreading a book on the physics of nothing and a small gift book on the virtues of Christmas
  • Reviewing updated resumes
  • Writing articles on diabetes, yoga, gluten free diets, and other health subjects

When I’m not working, I’m balancing this docket of work with some pretty breezy summer reads–mostly celebrity memoirs. It’s fun to take a peek into some icons of our present day, including some pretty funny ladies who’ve enjoyed success at Saturday Night Live and beyond.

Highlights, End of 2015

Happy New Year to all of you! The cold has settled in the Middle Atlantic states, and I am chugging along on some time-intensive projects that require me to move back and forth between The Chicago Manual of Style (CMoS) and the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).

Despite this ping-pong match between CMoS and APA, I am enjoying all of the work this new year brings.


Projects I worked on at the end of 2015 include:

  • Copyediting a journal on music education and a journal on Polish studies.
  • Editing a dissertation for a doctoral candidate in education.
  • Supporting a volume editor edit references and request permissions for a large-scale health textbook.
  • Reviewing marketing emails and blog posts for a graphic designer and lifestyle expert.
  • Compiling a handbook for a professional organization.
  • Writing articles for Healthline.

 

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And, in case you missed it, check out my recent blog post on the fabulous new coffee mugs I’ll be drinking from in the new year.

Now Writing for Healthline

I wanted to share that I’ve been writing for Healthline, a web resource for health and wellness topics, since June.

Here’s some of my latest work:

If you need a professional writer to tackle a topic for your website, blog, newsletter, or other publication, look no further. I love to help capture the ideas bouncing around the heads of my clients and put them into a coherent written document. Contact me for more information about my writing services.

Client Profile: Envivo Creative

I’m so glad I hired Natalie to write my website copy for me. All I had was a set of (what I thought were) incoherent notes about what I wanted my website to say and she was able to turn them into very readable copy that stayed true to my brand’s voice. It was like magic! She was happy to hear my suggestions and my hesitations and offered great advice when it was needed. I will definitely be hiring Natalie again in the future. She was a pleasure to work with!

— Tara Wilder, Envivo Creative

EnvivoCreative-mediumIn September, I had the great experience of collaborating with Tara Wilder, founder of Envivo Creative. Tara recently decided to leave her position as an online marketer for an information technology company to start a business that offers clients dynamic, results-driven online marketing campaigns. She even has a background in psychology, so she can really get into the head of your target market!

Tara WilderWhen I first spoke to Tara, she was finding it difficult to write the copy for her website. She decided to outsource this task, and I quickly realized that she was hitting writing roadblocks because she was too close to the project. After all, she lived and breathed Envivo Creative day in and day out — creating her business plan, working with a business coach, building her website, and attracting initial clients. As is so often the case, I could create her copy quickly and efficiently because of my distance from the business. I don’t stumble over ideas because I am mulling over the possibilities in my head, which can happen so often to entrepreneurs.

The Process

Tara and I began our collaboration with a 30-minute phone conversation. She discussed her company, and I asked relevant questions. Following our initial talk, I asked her to send me materials about her business as well as other ideas she had related to the copy. She requested writing samples, which I was happy to provide to her (and any other potential client).

For the next three weeks, Tara and I traded emails and ideas. I created a first draft of the copy, which she returned to me with notes and suggestions. We developed a great working relationship that fostered honest and productive feedback. By the end of our project, we felt like close colleagues, despite never meeting in person.

I am so excited to see how Tara’s business unfolds. I know Envivo Creative will help any small business get off the ground or grow with the effective marketing campaigns Tara and her team create. And I can’t wait to work with her and other entrepreneurs in the future. Helping someone develop ideas into coherent prose is one of my true passions.

Client Profile: Emi Kirschner (Via Caitlin Merto Designs)

EK_Logo_RGBOne of the reasons I love publishing is seeing the end product. There is nothing better than watching a project come to fruition. No matter whether it’s a book, journal, newsletter, or website, there are lots of moving parts in anything that ends up “out there” for public consumption. Recently, I got a huge rush after seeing the rebranding of a recent client, Emi Kirschner.

Emi, a food, wellness, and lifestyle coach, recently launched her new website, emikirschner.com. This site features a wealth of information and shares Emi’s talents, knowledge, and unique approach. In the near future, Emi will launch “French Fries to Foodies,” a program designed for parents whose kids tend to be picky eaters. Emi’s down-to-earth style and patience will help any family struggling with incorporating well-balanced meals into the daily routine.

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Emi Kirschner

The fabulous graphic artist Caitlin Merto, of Caitlin Merto Designs, implemented and executed Emi’s new brand. Caitlin and I have been collaborating for some time on various rebranding projects, and it was a pleasure to contribute to this one. Emi and I worked closely together to shape her website’s copy to reflect her target audience as well as her enhanced brand, as identified by Caitlin. Earlier in the summer, Emi and I worked on her “Buttoned-up Bio,” which she can use for her many speaking engagements, workshops, and other endeavors. I hope that the copy on Emi’s website conveys her amazing work and her dedication to living better.

Emi, thanks for letting me contribute to your exciting new brand. (And kudos to Leave It to Me Photography for Emi’s fabulous new photos!)